· Cross-knit looping · History · Knitting

Knitted tubes from Egypt

Hi there.  Your regular blog writer has graciously allowed me to submit this guest post.  Following up on his recent posts about knitting and nalbinding in Egypt, this post will talk a bit more about some lesser-known archaeological finds. There are several controversies in the history of knitting, but possibly the biggest one is the… Continue reading Knitted tubes from Egypt

History · Knitting

Arabic inscriptions on knitted stockings

A descriptive catalog of Textiles in Egypt 200–1500 AD in Swedish museum collections, prepared by Marianne Erikson and published in 1997, includes a “Knitted stocking with Arabic text.” It belongs to the Swedish Museum of Textile History (Textilmuseet in Borås) and is dated to the 11th–15th century CE. The photograph in the catalog shows the inscription… Continue reading Arabic inscriptions on knitted stockings

Cross-knit looping · History · Knitting

Coptic needlebinding and Islamic knitting

The preceding several posts examine older documents about the production of looped fabric in Scandinavia. The earliest of them, a Swedish text from 1730, makes a clear distinction between garments that are knitted (stickes) and those that are [needle]bound (bundna). Texts from the following decades use those terms with greater ambiguity. Although the crafts remain… Continue reading Coptic needlebinding and Islamic knitting

History · Looping · Nalbinding · Terminology

More historical terminology

In the third volume of his Glysisvallur — a massive description of all aspects of the Swedish province of Helsingland written circa 1730 — Olof Johan Broman includes the following description of yarn crafts under the heading of sheep husbandry: “Caps, mittens, stockings, and sweaters are knit [stickes] from both single and plied wool yarn. These… Continue reading More historical terminology

History · Nalbinding · Nålbindning · Techniques

Nalbound mittens in 1917

The 1917 volume of the Swedish periodical Fataburen includes an article by Maria Collin titled Sydda vantar. This literally means ‘stitched mittens’ and is an inversion of the term vantsöm seen in preceding posts. She discusses alternate designations at length including, as already noted, a dialectal reference to a mitten that was “bound with a needle or needlebound” (bunnen med… Continue reading Nalbound mittens in 1917

History · Nalbinding · Structures

Nalbinding: stitch structures

Margrethe Hald’s definition of nålebinding presented in the preceding post was intended to describe older textiles of Danish origin. She only used the name in Danish discourse and called it “looped needle-netting” in English. Nonetheless, nålebinding (lit. ‘needle binding’) made its way into the yarncraft vocabulary where it is now firmly established. Alongside the anglicized ‘nalbinding’ it names both… Continue reading Nalbinding: stitch structures