History · Nalbinding · Nålbindning · Techniques

Nalbound mittens in 1917

The 1917 volume of the Swedish periodical Fataburen includes an article by Maria Collin titled Sydda vantar. This literally means ‘stitched mittens’ and is an inversion of the term vantsöm seen in preceding posts. She discusses alternate designations at length including, as already noted, a dialectal reference to a mitten that was “bound with a needle or needlebound” (bunnen med… Continue reading Nalbound mittens in 1917

History · Nalbinding · Structures

Nalbinding: stitch structures

Margrethe Hald’s definition of nålebinding presented in the preceding post was intended to describe older textiles of Danish origin. She only used the name in Danish discourse and called it “looped needle-netting” in English. Nonetheless, nålebinding (lit. ‘needle binding’) made its way into the yarncraft vocabulary where it is now firmly established. Alongside the anglicized ‘nalbinding’ it names both… Continue reading Nalbinding: stitch structures

History · Nalbinding · Nålbindning

Nalbinding: derivation and description

In an earlier post about a Swedish looped purse from 1693, I noted that the maker’s name for the way it was produced — virka — has been used over time for a number of  different crafts. It appears again in a dialect dictionary compiled during the late 1790s, in the definition of sömma (literally ‘stitch’ or ‘seam’), a common… Continue reading Nalbinding: derivation and description

Crochet · Tools · Tunisian crochet

The double-end tricot hook

The long cylindrical hook normally associated with Tunisian crochet doesn’t differ physically from a hooked knitting needle. The past few posts here have considered evidence of that tool having been co-opted for some form of crochet before the first descriptions of Tunisian stitches were published. In contrast, the double-ended hook appears to have been taken into the… Continue reading The double-end tricot hook