History · Knitting · Techniques · Tools

Hook-tipped knitting needles and their traveling companions

The preceding post discussed hook-tipped knitting needles and the reasons why they are thought to be older than smooth-tipped ones. The schools of knitting in which they are used are further characterized by a method of holding the yarn that is generically termed “knitting around the neck.” This is believed to resemble the form of knitting… Continue reading Hook-tipped knitting needles and their traveling companions

History · Knitting · Sprang · Structures · Tools

Early knitting with hook-tipped needles

Texts about knitting often present needles with hooked tips as limited regional preferences to the commonplace smooth-tipped needles. The hooked form is considered to be the older of the two and initially used in Egypt where the craft is also believed to have originated. Such needles have been documented in Eastern Europe, Portugal, and Southern France —… Continue reading Early knitting with hook-tipped needles

Knitting · Structures · Techniques · Tools

More about the structure of early Egyptian knitting

A previous post discussed several pieces of tubular knitting reported to have been made in Egypt during the 1st millennium CE. (Thanks to Matthew Pius for spotting the earlier studies and guest blogging their central details, summarized and commented on below.) One of the tubes had been radiocarbon dated to the interval 425–594 CE (in this test report)… Continue reading More about the structure of early Egyptian knitting

Cross-knit looping · Early instructions · Knitting loom · Techniques

Methods for looping wire

Instructions for knitting tubes of thin metal wire on a small peg loom were published in 1822 in the Dutch periodical Penélopé. They describe a technique that is referred to in instructions for a loom-knitted purse that appeared in an 1823 issue of the same publication. I’ll translate the wirework instructions extensively in a separate… Continue reading Methods for looping wire

Knitting · Knitting loom · Loop-and-twist · Techniques

Methods for knitting metal tubes

Tubular open-stitch knitting of the previously described type is a common find at Viking sites. This discussion began with it because there is little question about it being stocking stitch in the present-day Western sense, albeit with a compound structure. Comparable specimens of twisted-stitch stocking stitch (“Eastern”) have also been found, as has the cross-knit looping… Continue reading Methods for knitting metal tubes